Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Will XP or Vista 32-bit confuse with 8GB installed?

  1. #1
    Xtreme Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    196

    Will XP or Vista 32-bit confuse with 8GB installed?

    My next build will have 8GB due to specific apps needing lots of RAM. That app will be running under a 64bit OS.

    However, I will be multibooting and playing games in XP (or Vista) 32bit.

    Now, if I have 4*2GB installed, will XP or Vista 32bit still work properly even if it can't address all the memory?

    I don't mind losing access to half of the memory when having booted into a 32-bit OS for gaming. But it has to be stable (i.e. no funny OS or game issues due to there being more RAM installed than the OS can address).

    Anybody actually tried this? (i.e. no hearsay, but real testing)?

  2. #2
    Xtreme Addict
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    1,394
    There wont be a problem as your O.S will only map the first 4GB found.

  3. #3
    Xtreme Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    557
    What games require 32bit OS?

  4. #4
    Xtreme Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    196
    All the games that I want to play fast.

    64bit Vista is slow as pokes for games, even when tweaked according to all the benchmarks I've seen. Not yet seen post sp1 tests though, but I doubt it radically changes the picture.

  5. #5
    I am Xtreme
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Australia! :)
    Posts
    6,096
    just play them on XP64 - imo this is the best OS out there
    DNA = Design Not Accident
    DNA = Darwin Not Accurate

    heatware / ebay
    HARDWARE I only own Xeons, Extreme Editions & Lian Li's
    https://prism-break.org/

  6. #6
    I am Xtreme
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    SiliCORN Valley
    Posts
    5,602
    Quote Originally Posted by Demo View Post
    There wont be a problem as your O.S will only map the first 4GB found.
    wrong

    32bit Os can only map 3 gigs of ram not 4gb.

    the memory hole remapping feature in some bios's claim that it allows the full 4 gigs of ram, but its doesnt work.
    there are reg tweaks out there that claim they can make all 4 show up but they dont work.

    if your system can handle the 8 gigs windows should be ok.
    but your 6 gigs will be invisible. thats 3 sticks of ram.
    "These are the rules. Everybody fights, nobody quits. If you don't do your job I'll kill you myself.
    Welcome to the Roughnecks"

    "Anytime you think I'm being too rough, anytime you think I'm being too tough, anytime you miss-your-mommy, QUIT!
    You sign your 1248, you get your gear, and you take a stroll down washout lane. Do you get me?"

    Heat Ebay Feedback

  7. #7
    Where's me Beer?
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    990
    Quote Originally Posted by Lestat View Post
    wrong

    32bit Os can only map 3 gigs of ram not 4gb.

    the memory hole remapping feature in some bios's claim that it allows the full 4 gigs of ram, but its doesnt work.
    there are reg tweaks out there that claim they can make all 4 show up but they dont work.

    if your system can handle the 8 gigs windows should be ok.
    but your 6 gigs will be invisible. thats 3 sticks of ram.
    What Demo said was technically correct, 32-bit windows will only map the first 4GB. However, the top level is reserved to hardware addressing, so you end up with 3GB - 3.8GB

  8. #8
    L-l-look at you, hacker.
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
    Posts
    4,642
    Quote Originally Posted by Lestat View Post
    wrong

    32bit Os can only map 3 gigs of ram not 4gb.
    Wrong.

    If a computer has a 32-bit OS, it will therefore use 32-bit addressing. The 32-bit wide address allows the processor to address 2^32 bytes of memory, which is exactly 4,294,967,296 bytes, or four gigabytes. As said above, the amount seen is often less than this, due to memory mapped I/O. Memory-mapped I/O places memory which is visible to a peripheral on the system bus (like a graphics card or HDD) in the address space of the processor. To communicate with the device, the processor can simply write the data into the range of memory the device has mapped into its address space. While significantly faster than using a specialised bus for I/O access, this means that the amount of DIMM RAM that your system can see is equal to 4GB minus all peripheral memory.
    Last edited by SoulsCollective; 03-22-2008 at 03:57 AM.
    Rig specs
    CPU: i7 5960X Mobo: Asus X99 Deluxe RAM: 4x4GB G.Skill DDR4-2400 CAS-15 VGA: 2x eVGA GTX680 Superclock PSU: Corsair AX1200

    Foundational Falsehoods of Creationism



  9. #9
    Where's me Beer?
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    990
    Quote Originally Posted by SoulsCollective View Post
    Wrong.

    If a computer has a 32-bit OS, it will therefore use 32-bit addressing. The 32-bit wide address allows the processor to address 2^32 bytes of memory, which is exactly 4,294,967,296 bytes, or four gigabytes. As said above, the amount seen is often less than this, due to memory mapped I/O. Memory-mapped I/O places memory which is visible to a peripheral on the system bus (like a graphics card or HDD) in the address space of the processor. To communicate with the device, the processor can simply write the data into the range of memory the device has mapped into its address space. While significantly faster than using a specialised bus for I/O access, this means that the amount of DIMM RAM that your system can see is equal to 4GB minus all peripheral memory.

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •