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Thread: Illustrative Guide: Modify your Scythe Infinity mounting system...

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    Illustrative Guide: Modify your Scythe Infinity mounting system...

    How to Modify the Scythe Infinity Mounting System for Optimum Mounting Pressure
    Drop your fully loaded CPU temperature by 3-6C!



    The Scythe Infinity is a great air cooler but the mounting system leaves a lot to be desired. Thankfully it lends itself to easy modification (nothing permanent) that allows you to set a mounting pressure that will yield optimum heat transfer.

    In this guide I will also introduce (and explain) the correct way to use liquid themal interface material (TIM) for best results. Continue on for a step-by-step illustrated guide on the right way to prep your system for this change, complete modifications, and correctly assembly of your equipment!


    Disclaimer: As always, risk assumed when working with your system is your own. Neither I nor Xtremesystems accepts any responsibility from damage, either direct or indirect, to yourself, your system or any of your other property that may results from your use of this guide. Only you know your experience level. Safety above all else.

    Materials needed:
    a) Scythe Infinity heatsink/fan unit (HSF)
    b) 4 x 1 1/2" 6-32 threaded brass screws
    c) 4 x 6-32 threaded brass knurled knobs
    d) 4 x small springs (optional albient recommended)
    e) 8 x 1/4" galvanized flat washers (up to 28 washers may be needed)
    f) 4 x insulating washers

    Tools/solvents required:
    a) 90% neat or greater isopropyl alcohol
    b) ArctiClean(TM) 2 Thermal Surface Purifier (optional)
    c) liquid metal TIM (optional, although some type of TIM is required)
    d) q-tips (A.K.A. cotton swabs)
    e) flat head screw driver
    f) small flat head screw driver (optional)
    g) 600 grit wet/dry sandpaper (optional)


    I highly recommend you lap your CPU until you see pure bare copper on the whole top-side...this insures that you are mounting on to a true, flat surface and will yield best results. Lapping alone can sometimes show up to a 10C gain depending on just how concave/convex your IHS is/was.


    Cleaning the mounting surfaces properly is extremely important. Remember, never apply TIM until you have removed all traces of contamination from any material that will be used as a mating surface for heat transfer. (Even the oil from your fingers can create excess thermal resistance which will only increase your CPU's temperature.) I can't stress enough the importance of working clean. As such, I recommend throughly cleaning both the top of the CPU and the bottom of the HSF with rubbing (isopropyl) alcohol and then finishing with ArctiClean 2. Q-tips make the perfect cleaning tool...don't be afraid of them.






    Here's what we should see after we lap the CPU and properly clean it.
    It's not important that you get a mirror finish. It does nothing to further improve heat transfer.






    Doing the same to each or your two Scythe Infinity "mounting wings," remove the Intel designed snap-clips...
    Note: You may need to use a small flat-head screwdriver to help the tab to clear the lip (seem in steps 4 & 5).

    You can discard all plastic pieces as we will not be using them or you can retain them for returning the component to manufacturer specifications at some other time if you like.






    Let's now take a moment to prep both of our thermal transfer surfaces.

    First, the CPU. Once you are satisfied that the CPU IHS, use your syringe of liquid TIM and place a small amount of the metal on the top of the IHS. A little goes a long way.

    An easy way to spread the liquid metal TIM is with a low-lint q-tip. Whatever you use, make sure it's clean.

    We don't want too much TIM but at the same time we want there to be enough that the two surfaces "fuse" together with the application of pressure and the multiple heat and cool cycles that you will use to cure the layer.






    We'll now do the same to the bottom of the HSF except that we will leave just about no extra TIM present.

    Coat the HSF in the same area that the IHS will contact. The liquid metal TIM will actually reflow when you turn your system on a do some stress testing. You will find that your CPU temperature will drop as much as another 2-3C during the week following this installation.

    Note: The final picture shows our HSF installed, we're not quiet there yet.






    The next series of pictures gives you an idea of what you're going to need to complete this modification.
    Most, if not all, of these parts should be easy to find in any hardware store. (I got mine from Lowes.)

    The inset picture in the last frame shows how to shim the screw in order to preload the spring. You may also need to do this to ensure the screws you use don't bind on the bottom of the heatsink.
    Using a 2" screw will result in the need to use ~6 washers and creates what I believe is the perfect stack height. A 1 and 1/2" screw is better for those that won't be using spings.

    Please note that the screw labeled as 1 and 1/2" in length is actually a 2" screw in my picture since I am using springs. I assume most others won't use springs since they can be a little harder to find.






    Although I show the screw assembly fully assembled in the above photo you will actually need to put it together when installing the your now bare mounting wings onto your motherboard.


    The below slides illustrates just how to do this:

    1) The head of the screw along with the preloading washers and the insulating washer are first inserted into the mounting holes from the bottom side of the motherboard.
    2) The bare screw protrudes from the top of the motherboard. Do one side at a time.
    3) Slide the mounting wing down over both screws. Remember that the retaining u-clips face inward. Next, one last washer.
    4) Finally, the spring. Finish of the assembly with the knurled knob. Only tighten it enough to hold assembly in place for now.






    The last part is a little tricky, but nothing we can't handle. Now that both the CPU IHS and the HSF bottom are ready to mount we are going to "clip" the heatsink into place, one side at a time, while holding the heatsink above the CPU.

    Once both sides are clipped in securely you can rest the heatsink down on the CPU. Press down slightly on the top of the HSF unit while finger-tightening the knurled knobs in a x-pattern.

    Finally, hold the knurled knobs steady while tightening again in an x-pattern. This time using your flat head screw driver to turn the screws from the bottom side of the motherboard.

    Stop once you see the motherboard start to bend slightly. Loading the screws any more from this point will only cause the board to bend more and won't change the mounting pressure. Cool, huh?



    I hope this guide has been helpful. Let us know what kind of temperature gains you see. I know it was worth it for me.



    -FCG

    Last edited by freecableguy; 12-21-2006 at 07:33 AM.

  2. #2
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    I don't have this HS, but I would like to say thanks for your efforts mate, thats a crackin guide!!!!!

  3. #3
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    I am speechless ... this guide rocks!!

    Kudos to you FCG!!!

    *Saves this for future usage*

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    FCG, you might want to mention where you got all of the materials for this. Mainly the springs though.

  5. #5
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    I think this would be a possible mounting alternative for many of the heatsinks out there, not just an infinity.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaxxxRacer
    FCG, you might want to mention where you got all of the materials for this. Mainly the springs though.
    Awesome guide FCG! I agree with Max, where did you get the springs?

    Also, do you think this guide would work with any heatsink that utilizes the push-pin mounting system? Thanks.
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    awesome guide... I have a SI but acknowledge the mtg system is weak.

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    Very nice guide Kris....but I'm with others, where do you get the springs? I've scoured Lowes with no luck

  9. #9
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    excellent guide... one reason i didn't look at this heatsink is the crappy peg mounting system... so i decided on Tuniq Tower 120 (on preorder).
    ---

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaxxxRacer
    FCG, you might want to mention where you got all of the materials for this. Mainly the springs though.
    Yea. I would like to know where you got the springs and what the length and outerdiameter of them are. I know MCMaster.com carries most of that stuff. Could get it easily for less than 20 bucks and even have more to spare

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cpt.Planet
    Yea. I would like to know where you got the springs and what the length and outerdiameter of them are. I know MCMaster.com carries most of that stuff. Could get it easily for less than 20 bucks and even have more to spare
    Correction. McMaster carries everything. Including the kitchen sink. (although I cant seem to find trimmer pots on there)

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaxxxRacer
    Correction. McMaster carries everything. Including the kitchen sink. (although I cant seem to find trimmer pots on there)

    Haha yes. This is true. I buy all my insulation and parts there. They do have a pretty decent selection of springs as well. I found a few brass ones that should fit.

  13. #13
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    Man, that brings back memories..I haven't used a MCMASTER CAR catolog since the early 90's when I worked at TRW repairing assembly lines.

    I used to day dream looking at all that stuff, and it always took me twice as long as it should to find what I was looking for becuase of it

  14. #14
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    really clean / nice mod FCG
    retired computer enthusiast

  15. #15
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    i am also wondering what sized springs you are using (outer diameter and length).

    one thing though... wouldn't putting 4-6 washers at the bottom prevent the mobo from sitting flush against a flat surface for (i.e. for benching).

    i assume 4-6 would be ok for a case since there are stand-offs for the mobo
    Last edited by shimmishim; 09-24-2006 at 10:50 AM.


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    Nice guide, great idea using springs and the 'knurled knob' nut. I will try to incorporate this into my TTBT mounting and guide. I tried wing nuts, but there just isn't enough clearance to rotate them.

    Are the backside washers really necessary? I don't see the reason for more than one. From my experience I would imagine those bolt/screw heads would touch the motherboard tray with that number of washers. May be a shorter screw and one washer would suffice. Sorry if I've missed the point here.

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    you are the best freecableguy
    Last edited by deetsnai; 09-24-2006 at 02:25 PM.
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  18. #18
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    I wish I saw this yesterday , I mounted it the other way instead.

    I also used liquid pro for TIM but I wish I cleaned the surface before I did that, I guess you learn like this.

    Love your work , now I have to find the items.

    At the mo I am in a bigger dillema and my side panel of the case wont shut cos mt Xclio A380 has a 250mm fan and if it was about 7mm shorter I wouldnt have had this problem, any ideas of how I can reduce the size of the infinity.

  19. #19
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    Why isn't this a sticky yet?


    Excellent guide Mr. Freecableguy. Bookmarked and thank you!
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  20. #20
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    Think this stuff could be readily found at Home Depot? I'm mostly concerned about the knurled knobs and how rare they'd be in a hardware store.

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    You could use a wingnut too.

  22. #22
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    Not necessarily....from the looks of it, there's but a few millimeters between the HSF and the knobs, definitely not enough to have a wingnut be able to make complete turns.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vapor
    Not necessarily....from the looks of it, there's but a few millimeters between the HSF and the knobs, definitely not enough to have a wingnut be able to make complete turns.
    Exactly what I was thinking. But I'm still wondering, how available are these knurled knobs? Somebody? Anyobody? Intel? Bueller?

  24. #24
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    amazing work FCG

    Did you use anything else other than the liquid thermal interface material ?
    How does the LTIM look

  25. #25
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    The CLP (LTIM) looks like, well, liquid metal, lol. I've bought a few tubes of it and it's a PAIN to remove and apply (on a non-perfectly flat surface), but it's great stuff, looks science-ficiton'y too.

    If you want a preview, go find an old thermometer and go and break it outside, away from all life.

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